Keith Savage

Achmelvich Beach, Sutherland, Scotland

Scotland’s northwestern coastline is studded with pristine strips of white and red sand beaches. More often than not you’ll find yourself alone with the wind, waves, and gulls with nothing to remind you of the current era. As with so many places in Scotland, hiring a car and exploring into Sutherland’s nooks and crannies yields treasures you’ll never lose and which take up no room in your luggage. These off-the-off-the-beaten-path beaches blossom under the onslaught of north Atlantic waves amidst incredibly ancient cliffs falling into crystal-clear waters. The beaches in this post are for solitude seekers and adherents to inner philosophies, for even a short while among the wind and waves is enough to clasp the unnameable… Read more...

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One of the glorious breakfasts at Mackay's Rooms in Durness, Sutherland, Scotland

Before I explored the North Coast 500 I performed quite a bit of research to pick the best stopping points along that mammoth and beautiful drive through Scotland’s northern highlands. There are vast stretches with no obvious place to bed down when your aim is to find a base for a few nights. Sure, you can book any B&B you stumble across, but I prefer not to switch accommodations every night. That’s simply not the best way to see Scotland, or, for that matter, most places.

The North Coast 500 takes you into the remotest parts of the Scottish mainland, places where the main road is a single track and oncoming traffic is sheep more often than not. Read more...

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Beautiful views along the Wee Mad Road of Sutherland, Scotland

Look at any map of Scotland and you’ll quickly gain a sense of the hierarchy of roadways. “M” roads are the biggest, fastest roads only around the central belt, and then you descend through “A” and “B” roads, the biggest of those with a single digit like the A9 and the smallest with as many as four digits, like the B8009. Some roads are so small they don’t have numbers or even names, they’re just squiggly white lines on the most detailed maps. This classification system does a pretty good job of setting expectations for what you’ll encounter out there in the Scottish wilderness — unnamed or multi-digit “B” roads are likely to be single-track and/or gravel, but it doesn’t tell the whole story. Read more...

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Beyond the deep sweep of Loch Eriboll and inland from Sutherland’s wind-scoured coast, Strathmore holds Hope in its mountainous embrace. The enduring eminence of Ben Hope, Scotland’s northernmost sentinel, reaches crag-faced for sky and space. Following Strathmore beneath Ben Hope’s sheer shoulders, modernity grows threadbare and distant. A wondrous broch falls to pieces. Time reveals itself as another of mankind’s constructions, another tawdry exercise in placing ourselves at the center of the universe. Under the overcast sky Loch Hope is a sheet of beaten iron mirroring the weather’s whims, mirroring the mind’s constant convulsion. 
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East Heddle, Orkney Crofts, Orkney Islands, Scotland

Upon my last visit to the Orkney Islands five years ago I found a series of renovated self-catering crofts in the heart of Orkney’s mainland called Orkney Crofts. I spent a solid four nights in one of the smaller crofts, The Bu, with my dad as we explored my favorite place in Scotland. I was blown away by the quality of the renovation, location of the crofts, and Simon Treasure’s (the man behind the venture) ability to retain their authenticity without slipping into generic luxury all too common in the ravenous high-end accommodation market.

As I departed Orkney and ended that 2012 trip, I wondered when I’d return to these mystical islands… Read more...

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